FoodFacts.com understands that there are so many health concerns that come from the consumption of excessive amounts of sugar. It’s so important for all of us to remember that the bulk of our sugar consumption isn’t coming from the sugar bowls on our kitchen tables, but rather the processed foods on our grocery store shelves. The obesity epidemic and the rise in the instances of diabetes are just a few of the things we’re already aware of that can be traced to the unnecessary amount of sugar in most American diets.

Today we read new information we wanted to share with you that’s really rather eye-opening. Researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston have revealed that consuming too much sugar can greatly increase the risk of heart failure.

This study follows previous research out of the Emory University School of Medicine and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that found that people consuming high levels of added sugar from processed foods and beverages are more likely to have higher heart disease risk factors.

This new study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association states that just one molecule of glucose metabolite glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) can lead to improper function of the heart. G6P builds up when people consume too much sugar and starch and causes severe stress to the heart.

Preclinical trials were conducted in animals and then researchers tested tissue from patients who had a piece of their heart muscle removed in order to have a left ventricle assist device placed. Results of both the clinical trials and the tissue studies revealed that G6P can cause significant heart damage. It was noted that those who have high blood pressure and other conditions already have their hearts under stress. When excess sugar is introduced into the situation, it can severely worsen that stress causing major injury to the heart.

The CDC reports that more than 5 million people suffer from heart failure in the United states every year. Half of those who are diagnosed with the condition die within one year of diagnosis and there are over half a million new cases diagnosed each year.

This new research underscores the importance of remaining aware of the amount of sugar we consume. Pointing directly to the possibility of additional and serious dangers from the over-consumption of sugar, the study can certainly motivate us all to become even more vigilant about the avoidance of added sugar in our diets. FoodFacts.com has always been an advocate of cooking fresh, healthy foods from the ingredients we choose ourselves. While picking up what’s quick and convenient might seem like a good idea at times, our hearts will thank us for the additional effort involved – and the reduction of sugar in our diets.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/262014.php