ingredient information
Strawberries Preserves
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Sixteenth-century author William Butler wrote this tribute to the strawberry: "Doubtless God could have made a better berry, but doubtless God never did." Red, juicy and conically shaped, the strawberry is a member of the rose family and has grown wild for centuries in both the Americas and Europe. The Romans valued the fruit for its reputed therapeutic powers for everything from loose teeth to gastritis. However, it wasn't until the late 13th century that the plant was first cultivated. The most common American variety is the result of several centuries of crossbreeding of the wild Virginia strawberry (North America's main native strawberry) and a Chilean variety.Commercial strawberry products include preserves, jams, jellies, syrups and various desserts. Strawberries are an excellent source of vitamin C and also provide some potassium and iron Fruit preserves are fruits, or vegetables, that have been prepared and canned for long term storage. The preparation of fruit preserves traditionally involves the use of pectin as a gelling agent, although sugar or honey may be used as well. Depending upon which ingredients are used and how they are prepared will determine the type of preserve; jams, jellies and marmalades are all examples of different styles of fruit preserves that vary based upon the ingredients used. There are various varieties of fruit preserves made globally, and they can be made from sweet or savory ingredients. In North America the plural form preserves is used, while the singular preserve is used in British and Commonwealth English. Additionally the name of the type of fruit preserves will also vary depending on the regional variant of English being used.