ingredient information
Soybeans Oil Partially Hydrolyzed
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The soybean (U.S. and UK) or soya bean (UK) (Glycine max) is a species of legume native to Eastern Asia. It is an annual plant that may vary in growth habit and height. It may grow prostrate, not growing higher than 20 cm (7.8 inches), or even stiffly erect up to 2 meters (6.5 feet) in height. The pods, stems, and leaves are covered with fine brown or gray pubescence. The leaves are trifoliate (sometimes with 5 leaflets), and the leaflets are 6-15 cm (2-6 inches) long and 2-7 cm (1-3 inches) broad; they fall before the seeds are mature. The small, inconspicuous, self-fertile flowers are borne in the axil of the leaf and are either white or purple. The fruit is a hairy pod that grows in clusters of 3-5, with each pod 3-8 cm (1-3 inches) long and usually containing 2-4 (rarely more) seeds 5-11 mm in diameter. Like corn and some other crops of long domestication, the relationship of the modern soybean to wild-growing species can no longer be traced with any degree of certainty. It is a cultural variety (a cultigen) with a very large number of cultivars. However, it is known that the progenitor of the modern soybean was a vine-like plant, that grew prone on the ground. Beans are classed as pulses whereas soybeans are classed as oilseeds. The word soy is derived from the Japanese word shoyu (soy sauce/soya sauce). Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soybean A word about "Partially Hydrogenated" Oils: It is now known that the process of hydrogenation creates "trans fatty acids" (TFAs), which are toxic entities that enter cell membranes, block utilization of essential fatty acids (EFAs) and impede cell functionality. TFAs also cause a rise in blood cholesterol. These substances are not present in natural oils. Trans fat, which is also called hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated vegetable oil. Trans fat is found in margarine and shortening and foods -- such as cookies, crackers and other commercially baked goods -- made with these ingredients. Trans fat raises LDL cholesterol and lowers high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the "good" cholesterol. Hydrolyzed: A protein obtained from various foods (like soybeans, corn or wheat), then broken down into amino acids by a chemical process called acid hydrolysis. Hydrolyzed plant or vegetable protein is used as a flavor enhancer in numerous processed foods like soups, chilis, sauces, stews and some meat products like frankfurters. Hydrolyzation of protein inevitably creates some (processed) free glutamic acid (MSG). Manufacturers are acutely aware that many consumers would prefer not to have MSG in their food. Some manufacturers have responded by using "clean labels," i.e., labels that contain only ingredient names they think consumers will not recognize as containing MSG -- names such as "hydrolyzed soy protein." Others advertise "No MSG," "No MSG Added," or "No Added MSG," even though their products contain MSG ref: truthinlabeling.org source: www.healthfinder.gov/news