ingredient information
Soybeans Grits
AAA
The soybean (U.S.) or soya bean (UK) (commonly misspelled "Soyabean") (Glycine max) is a species of legume native to East Asia. The plant is classed as an oilseed rather than a pulse. It is an annual plant that has been used in China for over 30,000 years as a food and a component of drugs. Soy is a good source of protein because it contains a significant amount of essential amino acids. Soybeans are the primary ingredient in many processed foods, including dairy product substitutes. The plant is sometimes referred to as greater bean (China) or edamame (Japan), though the latter is more commonly used in English when referring to a specific dish. The English word "soy" is derived from the Japanese pronunciation of ?? (????, shoyu), the Japanese word for Soya sauce; soya comes from the Dutch adaptation of the same word. Soybeans are an important source of vegetable oil and protein world wide. Soybean products are the main ingredients in many meat and dairy substitutes. They are also used to make soy sauce another 5,000 years old Chinese invention, and the oil is used in many industrial applications. The main producers of soy are China, the United States, Brazil and Argentina. Soybean contain significant amounts of alpha-Linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid, and the isoflavones genistein and daidzein. Grits is a Native American corn-based food common in the Southern United States, consisting of coarsely ground corn. Grits is similar to other thick maize-based porridges from around the world such as polenta. It also has a resemblance to farina, a thinner porridge. The word leads back to the traditional Northern European grit gruels. Grits can be served hot or cold and as a base for a multitude of dishes from breakfast to dessert, depending on the additives. Additives can range from salt and butter, meats (especially shrimp on the east or gulf coast), cheese, rarely (but in nouvelle Southern cuisine) vegetables, and sugar. Hominy grits is grits made from nixtamalized corn, or hominy. It is sometimes called sofkee or sofkey from the Creek word