ingredient information
Soybeans Cultured Organic
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There are over 1,000 varieties of this nutritious LEGUME, ranging in size from as small as a pea to as large as a cherry. Soybean pods, which are covered with a fine tawny to gray fuzz, range in color from tan to black. The beans themselves come in various combinations of red, yellow, green, brown and black. Their flavor is generally quite bland, which may explain why they weren't embraced by Western cultures until their nutritive value was discovered. Unlike other legumes, the soybean is low in carbohydrates and high in protein and desirable oil. Because they're inexpensive and nutrition-packed, soybeans are used to produce a wide variety of products Omega-3's Certain fatty fish, like salmon and tuna, contain the best source of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. But certain plant foods, like flaxseed and soybeans, also contain these fatty acids. Soybeans are one of the best non-fish sources of essential omega-3 fatty acids, which may help reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Compared to other beans like pinto beans and navy beans, soybeans have a higher fat content, but this fat contains these heart-healthy omega-3's. Organic food is produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations. Organic meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones. Organic food is produced without using most conventional pesticides; fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge; bioengineering; or ionizing radiation. Before a product can be labeled "organic," a Government-approved certifier inspects the farm where the food is grown to make sure the farmer is following all the rules necessary to meet USDA organic standards. Companies that handle or process organic food before it gets to your local supermarket or restaurant must be certified.