ingredient information
Soy Lecithin Enzyme Modified
AAA
Soy lecithin is a mixture of fatty substances that are derived from the processing of soybeans. Lecithin is separated from soybean oil by the addition of water and centrifugation (rapid spinning) and purified for use as a food additive. Its chemical name is phosphatidylcholine, which identifies its major components of choline, phosphoric acid, glycerin, and fatty acids. Lecithin is used widely in foods as an emulsifier, stabilizer, and antioxidant. Studies show most soy-allergic individual can safely eat products containing soy lecithin without experiencing any allergic reactions. Although soyfoods are widely recognized for their nutritional qualities, interest in soyfoods has risen recently because scientists have discovered that a soy component called isoflavones appears to reduce the risk of cancer. More research needs to be done to determine exactly how isoflavones work, but it appears that as little as one serving of soyfoods a day may be enough to obtain the benefits of this anticancer phytochemical. Traditional soy products such as tofu, tempeh, and soy milk are very high in protein. Tempeh has the highest percentage of protein of the traditional soy products providing approximately 22 grams of protein for each 4 ounce (113 gram) serving. Tofu provides approximately 9 grams of protein for a similar small serving size. The Recommended Dietary Allowance of protein for adult males (aged 25-50) is appoximately 63 grams and 50 grams for adult females (aged 25-50). Soy products can provide a significant portion of one's daily protein needs. It is important to keep in mind, however, that the balance of amino acids (protein building blocks) in soy is not the same as meat. Because soy foods does not have an ideal balance of amino acids, some experts recommend taking in a little extra soy foods and/or combining soy products or legumes with a whole grain dish at meals where other protein (e.g., eggs, fish) is not eaten. The amino acids in whole grains combine well with amino acids in soy and legumes to make a more ideal balance of amino acids. If a person's diet is reasonably-balanced, however, there is usually no need to be concerned about getting enough protein.