ingredient information
Sodium Acid Polyphosphate
AAA
Phosphoric acid is an essential constituent of the human organism, not only in the bones and teeth, but also in many enzyme systems. Phosphorus plays an important role in carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism. The level of inorganic phosphate in the blood is stabilized by exchange with the mineral depot in the skeleton through the action of parathyroid hormone. This hormone inhibits tubular reabsorption of phosphates by the kidney and brings about demineralization of bone tissue through the action of osteoclasts. The amount of parathyroid hormone that enters the circulation is probably regulated by the calcium level of the blood. Intestinal absorption depends on requirements and is therefore limited. Excretion takes place mainly in the faeces as calcium phosphate so that the continuous use of excessive amounts of sodium phosphate and phosphoric acid may cause a loss of calcium. As a result of physiological regulating mechanisms, man and animals can tolerate large variations in phosphate intake without the balance being upset. Some investigators have considered that the formation in the intestinal tract of insoluble salts of phosphate with calcium iron and other metal ions might result in decreased absorption of such minerals. From studies dealing with this aspect (Phosphoric acid is an essential constituent of the human organism, not only in the bones and teeth, but also in many enzyme systems. Phosphorus plays an important role in carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism. The level of inorganic phosphate in the blood is stabilized by exchange with the mineral depot in the skeleton through the action of parathyroid hormone. This hormone inhibits tubular reabsorption of phosphates by the kidney and brings about demineralization of bone tissue through the action of osteoclasts. The amount of parathyroid hormone that enters the circulation is probably regulated by the calcium level of the blood. Intestinal absorption depends on requirements and is therefore limited. Excretion takes place mainly in the faeces as calcium phosphate so that the continuous use of excessive amounts of sodium phosphate and phosphoric acid may cause a loss of calcium. As a result of physiological regulating mechanisms, man and animals can tolerate large variations in phosphate intake without the balance being upset. Some investigators have considered that the formation in the intestinal tract of insoluble salts of phosphate with calcium iron and other metal ions might result in decreased absorption of such minerals. From studies dealing with this aspect (Lang, 1959; van Esch et al., 1957; Lauersen, 1953; van Genderen, 1961) it is concluded that moderate dose levels of phosphates do not impair absorption as shown by results from carcass analyses or haemoglobin cathartics.