ingredient information
Peppers Jalapenos Puree Fire Roasted
AAA
A small green chile pepper that is mildly hot. They are named after Jalapa, the capital of Veracruz. Serrano peppers are a good substitute when there are no jalapenos on hand. In comparison with other chillies, it has a heat content that varies from mild to hot depending on how it was grown and how it was prepared. Most sources agree that much of the heat, due to capsaicin and related compounds, is concentrated in the seeds and the veins - deseeding and deveining can reduce the heat imparted to a recipe that includes jalapenos. The jalapeno rates between 2,500 and 8,000 Scoville units in heat. Good-quality Jalapeno peppers should be firm, smooth-skinned and have solid green coloring. Dry lines are not a blemish. They are signs of a mature pepper and indicate hotness. A chipotle is a jalapeno that has been smoked. http://www.answers.com/topic/jalape-o Roasting is a cooking method that uses dry heat, whether an open flame, oven, or other heat source. Roasting usually causes caramelization or Maillard browning of the surface of the food, which is considered a flavor enhancement. Meats and most root and bulb vegetables can be roasted. Any piece of meat, especially red meat, that has been cooked in this fashion is called a roast. Additionally, large uncooked cuts of meat are referred to as roasts.[1] Also, meats and vegetables prepared in this way are described as "roasted", e.g., roasted chicken or roasted squash. Purée and (more rarely) mash are general terms for food, usually vegetables or legumes, that have been ground, pressed, and/or strained to the consistency of a soft paste or thick liquid. Purées of specific foods are often known by specific names, e.g., mashed potatoes or apple sauce. The term is of French origin, where it meant in Ancient French (13th century): purified or refined. Purées overlap with other dishes with similar consistency, such as thick soups, creams (crèmes) and gravies — although these terms often imply more complex recipes and cooking processes. Coulis (French for "strained") is a similar but broader term, more commonly used for fruit purées. The term is not commonly used for paste-like foods prepared from cereal flours, such as gruel or muesli; nor with oily nut pastes, such as peanut butter. The term paste is often used for purées intended to be used as an ingredient, rather than eaten. Purées can be made in a blender, or with special implements such as a potato masher, or by forcing the food through a strainer, or simply by crushing the food in a pot. Purées generally must be cooked, either before or after grinding, in order to improve flavour and texture, remove toxic substances, and/or reduce their water content. It is common to purée entire meals (without use of salt or other additives) to be served to toddlers and babies as sufficient, nutritious meals.