ingredient information
Peppers Green Chili Dehydrated
AAA
Although most chili peppers are indigenous to South America, they are used and grown around the world. Hot peppers are used in abundance in Mexican, South American, Indonesian, African and Oriental cooking, while the milder peppers are common in European and North American recipes. And, peppers have been cultivated for thousands of years for their medicinal properties, known for lowering blood pressure and cholesterol, in addition to their culinary purposes. The Scoville Unit rating of a pepper is determined by a dilution taste test. Pure ground chili peppers are blended with a sugar-water solution. A panel of testers sips the mixture in increasingly diluted concentrations until it no longer burns the mouth. The Scoville Unit number is based on how much the ground chili needs to be diluted before no heat is detected. (Nowadays, liquid chromatography, rather than Scoville's dilution taste test, is used to evaluate the heat of chili peppers.) Dehydration (hypohydration) is defined as excessive loss of body water.[1] It is literally the removal of water (Ancient Greek: ?d??, hýdor) from an object. In physiological terms, it entails a relative deficiency of water molecules in relation to other dissolved solutes. There are three main types of dehydration; hypotonic (loss of strictly water), hypertonic (primarily a loss of electrolytes, sodium in particular), and isotonic (equal loss of water and electrolytes).