ingredient information
Peppers Anaheim Organic
AAA
Anaheim or New Mexican peppers are medium-hot peppers that are a major feature of Southwestern cooking and are frequently used to make decorative wall hangings. These pepper chains, called ristras, are usually composed of red, dried Anaheim peppers. Varieties Anaheim peppers are moderately hot, although their heat depends on where they’re grown and how mature they are. Varieties of the pepper grown in New Mexico tend to be hotter than those grown in California, and the mature red ones tend to be hotter than the green. The Anaheim chile varies from light green to dark green to red and grows to between 6 and 10 inches (15–25cm) long and 1 to 2 inches (2.5–5cm) around. The hotness of peppers is measured in Scoville heat units, and Anaheims have a heat score that ranges between 500 and 2,500. How high a chile pepper scores on the heat scale is determined by high-performance liquid chromatography measurement of parts per million capsaicin. This figure is then converted into the historic Scoville heat units that signify how much dilution is necessary to drown out the chile’s heat. Organic food is produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations. Organic meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones. Organic food is produced without using most conventional pesticides; fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge; bioengineering; or ionizing radiation. Before a product can be labeled "organic," a Government-approved certifier inspects the farm where the food is grown to make sure the farmer is following all the rules necessary to meet USDA organic standards. Companies that handle or process organic food before it gets to your local supermarket or restaurant must be certified.