ingredient information
Olives Kalamata Organic
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Kalamata is a region in Greece, famous for its production of olives and olive oils. In particular the Kalamata olive is often known as the Greek olive, and is distinct in taste and appearance from most green and black olives. When Kalamata olives are not used for olive oil, which is a fairly common use, they are normally brined, packed in olive oil or pickled in wine vinaigrette. Unlike most green and black olives, Kalamata olives are a deep, rich aubergine in color. When they are soaked in vinegar or brined, they may appear almost dark brown or black. On the tree, these purple almond-shaped fruits are hard to miss because of their beautiful color. They also tend to pack more meat than the average black variety. Most Kalamata olives are split prior to being brined or pickled, which allows the flavor, particularly of vinaigrette, to soak into the interior of the olive. Yet before you begin eating, be aware that these olives are usually sold with their seeds in. If you plan to serve these, eat them yourself, or add them to recipes, be sure to remove the seed first. source: http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-kalamata-olives.htm Organic food is produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations. Organic meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones. Organic food is produced without using most conventional pesticides; fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge; bioengineering; or ionizing radiation. Before a product can be labeled "organic," a Government-approved certifier inspects the farm where the food is grown to make sure the farmer is following all the rules necessary to meet USDA organic standards. Companies that handle or process organic food before it gets to your local supermarket or restaurant must be certified.