ingredient information
Oats Organic
AAA
The magic of oats lies in their high soluble fiber content which means of your body can use it very efficiently and turn it into slow release energy At the same time you will be taking in the highest amount of protein, calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, copper, manganese, thiamin, folacin and vitamin E of any other unfortified whole grain, like wheat, barley or rice. Add to all that its ability to lower your cholesterol levels. Here's the catch: You need to eat a sizable quantity of oats to reap their benefits. You must eat approximately 1 1/2 cups of cooked oatmeal (about 3/4 cup raw) every day to get the amount of soluble fiber necessary to lower your cholesterol. Organic food is produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations. Organic meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones. Organic food is produced without using most conventional pesticides; fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge; bioengineering; or ionizing radiation. Before a product can be labeled "organic," a Government-approved certifier inspects the farm where the food is grown to make sure the farmer is following all the rules necessary to meet USDA organic standards. Companies that handle or process organic food before it gets to your local supermarket or restaurant must be certified,( Organic food is produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations. Organic meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones. Organic food is produced without using most conventional pesticides; fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge; bioengineering; or ionizing radiation. Before a product can be labeled "organic," a Government-approved certifier inspects the farm where the food is grown to make sure the farmer is following all the rules necessary to meet USDA organic standards. Companies that handle or process organic food before it gets to your local supermarket or restaurant must be certified,