ingredient information
Mung Bean
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Mung bean, also known as green bean, mung, moong, moog dal (in bangla), mash bean, munggo or monggo, green gram, golden gram, and green soy, is the seed of Vigna radiata which is native to Bangladesh, India and Pakistan. The split bean is known as moong dal, which is green with the husk, and yellow when dehusked. The beans are small, ovoid in shape, and green in color. The English word "mung" derives from the Hindi moong. The mung bean is one of many species recently moved from the genus Phaseolus to Vigna and is still often seen cited as Phaseolus aureus or Phaseolus radiatus. These are all the same plant. Mung beans are commonly used in Chinese cuisine, where they are called lu dòu (??, literally "green bean"), as well as in Japan, Korea, Pakistan, India, Thailand and Southeast Asia. In Vietnam, they are called d?u xanh (again, literally "green bean"). They are generally eaten either whole (with or without skins) or as bean sprouts, or used to make the dessert "green bean soup". The starch of mung beans is also extracted from them to make jellies and "transparent/cellophane" noodles. In Vietnam, the transparent wrapping of Vietnamese spring rolls is made from mung bean flour. In Filipino cuisine, meat is sauteed with garlic, onions, and bay leaves, then mung beans are added and cooked. Mung batter is used to make crepes named Pesarattu in Andhra Pradesh, India. Filipino ginisang monggo (mung bean soup) with shrimp, served with smoked fish and tomatoWhole mung beans are generally prepared from dried beans by boiling until they are soft. In Chinese cuisine, whole mung beans are used to make a táng shui, or dessert, otherwise literally translated, "sugar water", called ludòu tang shui, which is served either warm or chilled, and is considered an antidote to thirst.[citation needed] In Indonesia, they are made into a popular dessert snack called es kacang hijau, which has the consistency of a porridge. The beans are cooked with sugar, coconut milk, and a little ginger. Although whole mung beans are also occasionally used in Indian cuisine, beans without skins are more commonly used; but in Kerala, whole moong dal (cheru payaru) is commonly boiled to make a dry preparation that is often had with rice gruel (kanji). In the Philippines, it is the main ingredient of the dessert hopiang munggo, and also a savory soup called ginisang monggo.