ingredient information
Micro Peptides
AAA
Peptides (from the Greek pept?d?a, "small digestibles") are short polymers formed from the linking, in a defined order, of a-amino acids. The link between one amino acid residue and the next is called an amide bond or a peptide bond. Proteins are polypeptide molecules (or consist of multiple polypeptide subunits). The distinction is that peptides are short and polypeptides/proteins are long. There are several different conventions to determine these, all of which have caveats and nuances. One convention is that those peptide chains that are short enough to be made synthetically from the constituent amino acids are called peptides rather than proteins. However, with the advent of better synthetic techniques, peptides as long as hundreds of amino acids can be made, including full proteins like ubiquitin. Native chemical ligation has given access to even longer proteins, so this convention seems to be outdated. Another convention places an informal dividing line at approximately 50 amino acids in length (some people claim shorter lengths). This definition is somewhat arbitrary. Long peptides, such as the amyloid beta peptide linked to Alzheimer's disease, can be considered proteins; and small proteins, such as insulin, can be considered peptides.