ingredient information
Lactic Acid
AAA
Lactic acid is primarily found in sour milk products, such as: koumiss, leban, yogurt, kefir, and some cottage cheeses. The casein in fermented milk is coagulated (curdled) by lactic acid. Although it can be fermented from lactose (milk sugar), most commercially used lactic acid is derived by using bacteria such as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, or Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (formerly known as Lactobacillus bulgaricus) to ferment carbohydrates from nondairy sources such as cornstarch, potatoes, and molasses. Thus, although it is commonly known as "milk acid", vegan products can contain lactic acid as an ingredient. Lactic acid may also be found in various processed foods, usually either as a pH-adjusting ingredient, or as a preservative (either as antioxidant or for control of pathogenic micro-organisms). It may also be used as a fermentation booster in rye and sourdough breads. Potassium lactate, sodium lactate, and calcium lactate are the neutralized salts of lactic acid. Potassium lactate is used in many fresh and cooked meat products for shelf life control, color preservation, and reduction of sodium content. Sodium lactate has a mild saline taste and is therefore suitable for flavor enhancement in meat products as well. Sodium lactate is being produced in solution as well as dry. Calcium lactate is popular for fortification and improved texture in emulsified meat products like frankfurters. Ready-to-eat meat and poultry products commonly contain sodium or potassium lactate to control Listeria monocytogenes. Lactic acid is also present in wheat beers, especially lambic, due to the activity of Pediococcus damnosus. Lactic acid is widely used for reducing the number of pathogenic bacteria like E.coli, Salmonella, Campylobacter, and Listeria on animal carcasses like beef, pork, and poultry during the slaughtering process. source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactic_acid