ingredient information
L Carnitine
AAA
L-Carnitine is not an amino acid in the strict sense (it is not used as a neurotransmitter or in protein synthesis), however L-Carnitine bears many resemblances to amino acids and is usually grouped under this heading. L-Carnitine (the "L" refers to its chemical polarity) is used by the body to transport long chain fatty acids to the mitochondria in your cells, where they are burned for energy. Since this fat burning is such a major source of muscular energy, deficiencies in L-Carnitine are manifested as low energy levels and muscular weakness. L-Carnitine deficiencies can also appear as mental confusion or cloudiness, angina (heart pain) and weight gain. L-Carnitine can be manufactured in the body provided the requisite vitamins and minerals are also present. These vitamins and minerals are B1, B6, C, and iron. The amino acids lysine and methionine are also needed for L-Carnitine synthesis. L-Carnitine is also present in meats and other animal foods, so if you are a vegetarian or vegan you may want to consider supplementing with L-Carnitine. This would be especially important if you are an athlete, since you are using lots of L-Carnitine during periods of exertion