ingredient information
Garcinia Cambogia Rind Extract
AAA
Also known as mangosteen, malabar tamarind, brindall berries, Citrin or Citrimax. Active ingredient is hydroxycitric acid (HCA), which may inhibit liver enzyme activity. Source: GNC.com In recent years, Garcinia cambogia has been promoted for weight loss due to various possible effects it may have on the body. First, it is believed to interfere with an enzyme needed to store fat, possibly causing more fat from foods to be eliminated from the body. In addition, Garcinia cambogia may cause the body to use existing fat stores for energy during prolonged exercise. Ordinarily, carbohydrates are used before fats during exercise. In animal studies, hydroxycitric acid (HCA), a major component of Garcinia cambogia, also seemed to reduce appetite by raising the amount of serotonin in the body. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter (a chemical that carries messages from nerve cells to other cells) that is thought to affect appetite control. In clinical studies of humans, however, individuals who took Garcinia cambogia while following a weight-reduction diet lost no more weight, on average, than members of a control group who followed the same diet without taking a supplement. Other human studies have had mixed results on appetite reduction; some showed little or no effect, while others reported a 15% to 30% decrease in food intake. More studies are needed to prove or disprove the effectiveness of Garcinia cambogia in weight control. In unrelated studies, Garcinia cambogia has appeared to prevent the development of stomach ulcers in laboratory animals exposed to alcohol. Although the exact process is still unclear, the HCA in Garcinia cambogia is believed to reduce the production of stomach acid. Excess amounts of stomach acid may contribute to the development of stomach ulcers. Garcinia cambogia may also enhance the ability of the stomach lining to resist damage. No human studies have been performed to confirm this effect. Source:http://www.drugdigest.org/DD/DVH/HerbsWho/0,3923,4071%7CGarcinia+Cambogia,00.html Extract The distilled or evaporated oils of foods or plants (such as nuts, seeds, fruits, vegetables, herbs, spices, bark, buds, roots, leaves, meat, poultry, seafood, fish, dairy foods, or eggs) that are dissolved in an alcohol base or allowed to dry to be used as a flavoring. Food extracts as they are often labeled, are used to add a concentrated flavor to many food dishes, especially baked goods and desserts, without adding additional volume. Available in solid (cubes, granules or powdered), liquid or jelled form, extracts may be labeled as pure, natural or artificial. Pure and natural extracts are governed by laws in many countries that require compliance with procedures that take the extract ingredients directly from the named flavor, such as extracting oils directly from the vanilla bean to make pure or natural vanilla extract. Artificial extracts are flavors that do not necessarily use any ingredients directly from a source named for the extract but instead used combinations of ingredients to arrive at a flavor representative of the named food extract, such as artificial lemon extract. Some of the most widely used extracts include vanilla, almond, anise, maple, peppermint, and numerous solid or jelled extracts such as beef and chicken bouillon or meat demi-glaces. As an example of how the pure and natural extract is made, vanilla extract is created by soaking vanilla beans in water and an alcohol-based solution where it ages for several months, during which time the vanilla flavor is extracted from the bean. Anise extract, a sweet licorice tasting flavoring, is produced by dissolving the oil of anise seeds into alcohol. Grape extract is produced to assist with the wine making process. Compounds from the skin of grapes are extracted and added to the wine in order to impart tannin, color, and body into a wine. The characteristics of the wine can be changed dramatically by the amount of time the wine is in contact with the skins. If the grapes are in contact for too long, the resulting wine may be too potent, or what is sometimes called “over-extracted�. Juices of fruits and vegetables are often extracted as juice extracts to be used similar to other food extracts, as a flavoring when preparing foods. A common utensil for the purpose of extracting lemon juice is available to assist with home recipes requiring a lemon flavoring.