ingredient information
Gadolinium
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Gadolinium is a chemical element that has the symbol Gd and atomic number 64. This is an FDA approved contrast agent for MRI. Gadolinium, or gadodiamide, provides greater contrast between normal tissue and abnormal tissue in the brain and body. Gadolinium looks clear like water and is non-radioactive. After it is injected into a vein, Gadolinium accumulates in the abnormal tissue that may be affecting the body or head. Gadolinium causes these abnormal areas to become very bright (enhanced) on the MRI. This makes it very easy to see. Gadolinium is then rapidly cleared from the body by the kidneys. Gadolinium, gadolinium-DPTA, gadodiamide. It also goes by various brand names, depending on the pharmaceutical company that makes it: Gadolinium is a silvery-white, malleable and ductile rare-earth metal with a metallic lustre. It crystallizes in hexagonal, close-packed alpha form at room temperature, but, when heated to 1508 K or more, it transforms into its beta form, which has a body-centered cubic structure. Unlike other rare earth elements, gadolinium is relatively stable in dry air. However, it tarnishes quickly in moist air, forming a loosely-adhering oxide which spalls off, exposing more surface to oxidation. Gadolinium reacts slowly with water, and is soluble in dilute acids. Gadolinium is used for making gadolinium yttrium garnets, which have microwave applications, and gadolinium compounds are used for making phosphors for colour TV tubes. Gadolinium is also used for manufacturing compact discs and computer memory. Gadolinium is used in nuclear marine propulsion systems as a burnable poison. Gadolinium is also used as a secondary, emergency shut-down measure in some nuclear reactors, particularly of the CANDU type. Gadolinium also possesses unusual metallurgic properties, with as little as 1% of gadolinium improving the workability and resistance of iron, chromium, and related alloys to high temperatures and oxidation.