ingredient information
DL Alpha Tocopherol Acetate
AAA
Tocopherols (or TCP) are a class of chemical compounds of which many have vitamin E activity. It is a series of organic compounds consisting of various methylated phenols. Because the vitamin activity was first identified in 1936 from a dietary fertility factor in rats, it was given the name "tocopherol" from the Greek words “t????� [birth], and “f??e??�, [to bear or carry] meaning in sum "to carry a pregnancy," with the ending "-ol" signifying its status as a chemical alcohol. Tocotrienols, which are related compounds, may also have vitamin E activity. All of these various derivatives with vitamin activity may correctly be referred to as "vitamin E." Tocopherols and tocotrienols are fat-soluble antioxidants but also seem to have many other functions in the body. The compound a-tocopherol, a common form of tocopherol added to food products, is denoted by the E number E307. An acetate, or ethanoate, is either a salt or ester of acetic acid. In chemistry, the abbreviation Ac refers to the acetyl group. The anion and the functional group may be written as -OAc and AcO-, or OAc respectively. Examples include HOAc for acetic acid, NaOAc for sodium acetate, and EtOAc for ethyl acetate. An acetate ester is an ester of acetic acid, with the general formula CH3COOR, where R is an organyl group. Acetate can also refer to cellulose acetate, especially fibres or other derived products such as the acetate disc used in audio record production. Cellulose acetate can be found in many household products.