ingredient information
Dill Pickles
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Dill is mainly used in pickling, where most of the plant is used. “Dill Pickles� have become a North American classic and in Europe Sauerkraut and dill vinegars have been popular for centuries. It is especially popular in Russia and Scandinavia, where it is used in courts-bouillons and sauces for fish, pickled salmon, casseroles and soups. It is also used on cakes and breads, particularly in rye breads, the way caraway is used. Dill should be used sparingly as the flavour grows. Its flavour works well in sour cream and yogurt sauces. The chopped fresh leaves are frequently used with trout and salmon, shrimp, deviled eggs, green beans, cauliflower, beets, soups, cottage and cream cheese. Source:http://www.theepicentre.com/Spices/dill.html A "kosher" dill pickle is not necessarily kosher in the sense that it has been prepared under rabbinical supervision, which would ensure that no non-kosher ingredients were used, and that no utensil in contact with the pickles had ever been in contact with food that was not kosher. Rather, it is a pickle made in the traditional manner of Jewish New York City pickle makers, with generous addition of garlic to the brine.[2][3] At least one New York restaurant was serving dill pickles in the nineteenth century