ingredient information
Coconut Partially Hydrogenated
AAA
Dried coconut meat, called copra, is pressed and used to make coconut oil, which is used in commercial frying and as a component in many packaged goods such as candies, margarines, soap and cosmetics. Coconut oil-one of the few nonanimal saturated fats-is used widely in the manufacture of baked goods such as commercial cookies. Certain major manufacturers have replaced it with the more expensive unsaturated fats with an eye toward cholesterol consciousness. A word about "Partially Hydrogenated" Oils: Hydrogenation is the process of heating an oil and passing hyrdrogen bubbles through it. The fatty acids in the oil then acquire some of the hydrogen, which makes it more dense. If you fully hydrogenate, you create a solid (a fat) out of the oil. But if you stop part way, you get a semi-solid partially hydrogenated oil that has a consistency like butter, only its a lot cheaper. (NOTE: The difference between a "fat" and an "oil" is temperature. A "fat" is a lipid that is solid at room temperature. An "oil" is one that is liquid at room temperature. Both are lipids (or "oil/fat"). Change the temperature, and you can convert an oil into a fat, or vice versa.) Because of that consistency, and because it is cheap, it is a big favorite as a butter-substitute among "food" producers. It gives their products a richer flavor and texture, but doesn't cost near as much as it would to add butter. They interfere with the metabolic processes of life by taking the place of a natural substance that performs a critical function. Partially hydrogenated oils will not only harm you in the long term, but in the meantime they will make you fat. Source: www.collegecentral.com & Cyberparent.com & www.TreeLight.com