ingredient information
Cinnamon Bark Organic
AAA
This ancient spice is a popular flavoring in many cuisines, and is especially noted for its delectable aroma. There are many species of cinnamon, but Chinese cinnamomum trees, evergreens native to China and Vietnam and now cultivated in many parts of Asia, are the source for medicinal cinnamon bark remedies used in Chinese, Indian, and Western traditional medicine. A close relative, cassia, is often used interchangeably with cinnamon. Its name comes from the Greek word kassia, meaning "strip off the bark." Medicinal use of cinnamon bark was first recorded in Chinese formularies as early as 2700 B.C. The herb has been used as a healing aid for stomach upset and gas, diarrhea, rheumatism, kidney ailments, and abdominal pain. Cinnamon "drops" containing the essential oils of cinnamon and cassia are also used for many of the same purposes. Possibly because Chinese cinnamon has antiseptic properties, the bark and the essential oils it contains are also used in topical products such as liniments, soaps, and lotions, and in oral preparations such as toothpaste and mouthwash. Organic food is produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations. Organic meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones. Organic food is produced without using most conventional pesticides; fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge; bioengineering; or ionizing radiation. Before a product can be labeled "organic," a Government-approved certifier inspects the farm where the food is grown to make sure the farmer is following all the rules necessary to meet USDA organic standards. Companies that handle or process organic food before it gets to your local supermarket or restaurant must be certified,