ingredient information
Cheese Blue Dehydrated
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Blue cheese is a general classification of cow's milk and/or goat's milk cheeses with a blue or blue-green mold. Roquefort cheese is a particular blue cheese that is made in the south of France. Some other blue cheeses are Stilton (England), Gorgonzola (Italy), Danablu (Denmark), and Americas' entry, Maytag Blue Cheese. These are just a few, there are many more blue cheeses. The blue mold in these cheeses is due to mold spores from Penicillium roqueforti or Penicillium glaucum, etc. Originally each of these cheeses were produced in caves in their respective areas, where the mold was naturally present. This combined with the unique nutrients that the mold grew on in the caves affected the flavor, texture and blue-green color of the mold in each of these cheeses. In the beginning, this was most likely discovered by accident when cheeses were stored in the caves, and they developed mold. Then someone decided to taste the cheese that others might have thought to be ruined, and realized how exquisite the taste had become. Most blue cheeses today are either injected with the mold, as with Roquefort, or the mold is mixed right in with the curds, as it is with Gorgonzola, to insure even distribution of the mold. Most of these cheeses must still be aged in the original caves where they were developed to bear the name. The process for making America's ‘Maytag Blue Cheese’ was developed by the Iowa State U. in 1941 (it is a process for making blue cheese with pasteurized milk.) Production was begun by Fred Maytag II (of dishwasher fame) when he heard about the new process. Maytag blue is also aged in specially designed caves. Some specialist cheeses are made using mouldy breadcrumbs rather than chemical moulds, thus they may contain wheat. Source: http://www.foodreference.com/html/artbluecheese.html