ingredient information
Canola Oil Shortening
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Canola is an oilseed crop which is grown primarily in regions of Western Canada. Each canola plant produces yellow flowers which, in turn, produce pods, similar in shape to pea pods but about 1/5th the size. Within the pods are tiny round seeds that are crushed to obtain canola oil. Each seed contains approximately 40 per cent oil. The remainder of the seed is processed into canola meal which is used as a high protein livestock feed. Nutrition experts recognize canola oil as having the best fatty acid ratio. Research indicates the fatty acid composition of canola oil is most favourable in terms of health benefits and as part of a nutritionally balanced diet. Shortening is a semisolid fat used in food preparation, especially baked goods, and is so called because it promotes a "short" or crumbly texture (as in shortbread).Shortening is basically just fat or lard from an animal or vegetable. The term "shortening" can be used more broadly to apply to any fat that is used for baking and which is solid at room temperature, such as butter, lard, or margarine. Shortening often has a higher smoke point than butter and margarine, and it has 100% fat content, compared to about 80% for butter and margarine. Although the term has been in use for many years, it is now known that shortening works by inhibiting the formation of long protein (gluten) strands in wheat-based doughs. The similarity in terms is entirely coincidental since full understanding of the structure and chemistry of dough is comparatively recent. source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shortening Trans fat is found in margarine and shortening and foods -- such as cookies, crackers and other commercially baked goods -- made with these ingredients. Trans fat raises LDL cholesterol and lowers high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the "good" cholesterol. Hydrolyzed: A protein obtained from various foods (like soybeans, corn or wheat), then broken down into amino acids by a chemical process called acid hydrolysis. Hydrolyzed plant or vegetable protein is used as a flavor enhancer in numerous processed foods like soups, chilis, sauces, stews and some meat products like frankfurters. Hydrolyzation of protein inevitably creates some (processed) free glutamic acid (MSG). Manufacturers are acutely aware that many consumers would prefer not to have MSG in their food. Some manufacturers have responded by using "clean labels," i.e., labels that contain only ingredient names they think consumers will not recognize as containing MSG -- names such as "hydrolyzed soy protein." Others advertise "No MSG," "No MSG Added," or "No Added MSG," even though their products contain MSG ref: truthinlabeling.org source: www.healthfinder.gov/news