ingredient information
Black Currant Organic
AAA
The black currant is a shrub with maple-like leaves with toothed edges. It grows from 2-4 feet off the ground. They are native to the Midwest. You can look for them in a wooded area with openings, bottomlands or slopes. In spring, their flowers are yellowish-white and look like small bells growing alternate in a row. In the fall, you’ll find 4-6 black-red fruits in a cluster from the main branch. This plant is popular with people and wildlife. Black currants are very nutritious and people love to make jellies and preserves from the berries. They're great on pancakes and ice cream. They also make wonderful glazes for meats like fish and poultry Black Currant Oil (Immune) is arich source of gamma linolenic acid, GLA, along with other important polyunsatura-ted fatty acids. Fatty acids are involved in many body functions, such as maintaining body temperature, insulating nerves, cushioning and protecting tissues and creating energy. These essential fatty acids are precursors of prostaglandins, which must be present for functions involved with dilating blood vessels, regulating arterial pressure, metabolizing cholesterol, activating T-lymphocytes, protecting against platelet aggregation, controlling abnormal cell proliferation, and other functions. Before the discovery of black currant oil, the only other known sources of GLA were mother’s milk and evening primrose oil. Organic food is produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations. Organic meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones. Organic food is produced without using most conventional pesticides; fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge; bioengineering; or ionizing radiation. Before a product can be labeled "organic," a Government-approved certifier inspects the farm where the food is grown to make sure the farmer is following all the rules necessary to meet USDA organic standards. Companies that handle or process organic food before it gets to your local supermarket or restaurant must be certified.