ingredient information
Beets Dehydrated
AAA
One cup of raw beets is high in carbohydrates and low in fat. It contains phosphorus, sodium, magnesium, calcium, iron, and potassium, as well as fiber, vitamins A and C, niacin, folic acid, and biotin. Although these are not found in U.S. "Recommended Daily Allowance" (RDA) quantities, we must remember that nutrients derived from natural sources may be "better" than those found in supplements, as they are found in an organic form. When these nutrients are captured in a juicing process, they remain in a form that is much easier to assimilate than synthetic nutrients. The iron in beet juice, in particular, is noted for being much more easily assimilated than man-made forms of iron. Commonly known as the garden beet, this firm, round root vegetable has leafy green tops, which are also edible and highly nutritious. The most common color for beets is a garnet red. However, they can range in color from deep red to white, the most intriguing being the Chioggia (also called "candy cane"), with its concentric rings of red and white. Beets are available year-round and should be chosen by their firmness and smooth skins. Small or medium beets are generally more tender than large ones. If the beet greens are attached they should be crisp and bright. Store beets in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks. Just before cooking, wash beets gently so as not to pierce the thin skin, which could cause nutrient and color loss. Peel beets after they've been cooked. Dehydration (hypohydration) is defined as excessive loss of body water.[1] It is literally the removal of water (Ancient Greek: ?d??, hýdor) from an object. In physiological terms, it entails a relative deficiency of water molecules in relation to other dissolved solutes. Some definitions even require a rise in blood sodium concentration[2], but in reality a loss of body water usually accompanies a loss of solutes as well