ingredient information
Baking Powder Aluminum Free
AAA
Most recipes that call for baking powder intend for you to use double-acting baking powder. This includes two acidic salts--one that reacts when wet and one that reacts heated. By giving the baking soda two chances to react, it usually results in light and airy baked goods. Less common is single-acting baking powder, which only reacts when it becomes wet. When using this kind of baking powder, you have to get the batter into a preheated oven immediately after you mix the wet and dry ingredients together. Aluminum-free baking powder is preferred by many cooks; powders made with aluminum lend an unpleasant flavor to delicately-flavored baked goods. Substitutes (for 1 teaspoon of baking powder): Combine 5/8 teaspoon cream of tartar plus 1/4 teaspoon baking soda OR Combine two parts cream of tartar plus one part baking soda plus one part cornstarch OR Add ¼ teaspoon baking soda to dry ingredients and ½ cup buttermilk or yogurt or sour milk to wet ingredients. Decrease another liquid in the recipe by ½ cup. OR Add ¼ teaspoon baking soda to dry ingredients and ¼ cup molasses to wet ingredients. Decrease another liquid in the recipe by 2 tablespoons. OR 1 teaspoon baker’s ammonia (This yields a very light, airy product, but can impart an ammonia flavor to baked goods. It's best used in cookies, which are flat enough to allow the ammonia odor to dissipate during cooking.