ingredient information
Apples Granny Smith Organic
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The Granny Ramsey Smith green apple is a tip-bearing apple cultivar, which originated in Australia in 1868. It is named after Maria Ann Smith, who propagated the cultivar from a chance seedling. The tree is thought to be a hybrid of Malus sylvestris, the European Wild Apple, with the domestic apple M. domestica as the polleniser. Widely propagated in New Zealand, it was introduced to the United Kingdom c. 1935 and the United States in 1972 by Grady Auvil. The fruit has hard, light green skin and a crisp, juicy flesh. In some parts of Canada the Granny Smith is referred to as a Green Delicious. [edit] History Maria Ann Ramsey Sherwood Smith (1799–1870)The cultivar originated in Eastwood, New South Wales, Australia (now a suburb of Sydney) in 1868 from a chance seedling propagated by Maria Ann Smith (née Sherwood, b. 1799, d. 9 March 1870), from whom comes the name.[1] The tree is thought to be a hybrid of Malus sylvestris, the European Wild Apple, with the domestic apple M. domestica as the polleniser. Widely propagated in New Zealand, it was introduced to the United Kingdom c. 1935 and the United States in 1972 by Grady Auvil. [edit] PropertiesApple, raw, with skin Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz) Energy 218 kJ (52 kcal) Carbohydrates 13.81 g - Sugars 10.39 g - Dietary fiber 2.4 g Fat 0.17 g Protein 0.26 g Thiamine (Vit. B1) 0.017 mg (1%) Riboflavin (Vit. B2) 0.026 mg (2%) Niacin (Vit. B3) 0.091 mg (1%) Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.061 mg (1%) Vitamin B6 0.041 mg (3%) Folate (Vit. B9) 3 µg (1%) Vitamin C 4.6 mg (8%) Calcium 6 mg (1%) Iron 0.12 mg (1%) Magnesium 5 mg (1%) Phosphorus 11 mg (2%) Potassium 107 mg (2%) Zinc 0.04 mg (0%) Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. Source: USDA Nutrient database Granny Smith apples are light green in colour. They are eaten raw and commonly used in pie baking. This cultivar needs fewer winter chill hours and a longer growing season to mature the fruit, so it is favoured for the milder areas of the apple growing regions. It is moderately susceptible to fire blight and is highly prone to scab,[2] powdery mildew, and cedar apple rust.