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Eat your asparagus … you might be preventing breast cancer!

FoodFacts.com is always thrilled to learn how natural foods can play an important role in the prevention and treatment of disease. Breast cancer affects so many – not only in our own country where over 200,000 women are diagnosed with the disease each year – but worldwide.

A study out of the Rajiv Gandhi University in Bangalore, Karnatak, India illustrates that compounds known as shatavarins found in the roots of asparagus show the potential for anticancer, particularly activity against human breast cancer cells.
The researchers involved prepared shatavrin IV, the ingredient found in asparagus that is active against cancer and isolated it in a preparation. The prepared shatavrin IV samples were tested in human breast cancer cell lines, colon adenocarcinoma cell lines and human kidney carcinoma cell lines to determine the different cells’ reactions.

The shatavarin IV preparations showed the potential to be effective in fighting cancer cells.

In addition to testing done in this manner, on oral administration of an extract of asparagus was also prepared. It was given in doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight for 10 days. It was discovered that this led to a significant reduction in tumor volume and viable tumor cell count as well as an increase in the non-viable cell count. In addition to these results, the asparagus extracts also restored blood parameters to normal levels.
Based on these findings, researchers concluded that the asparagus preparations show noteworthy anticancer potential.

This promising study could lead to new and natural treatments for breast cancer and provide hope that there are less toxic treatments than the traditional medical approaches to the disease. While we know that such treatments are effective in many cases, they are also incredibly difficult for patients to endure. FoodFacts.com understands that for breast cancer patients and those who love them, a solution that may come from a simple vegetable would offer a far less traumatic path for patients worldwide.

And based on this research, perhaps we should be serving more asparagus with our meals and get used to telling our children “Eat your asparagus,” just as often as we’ve ever told them to eat their broccoli!

Read more about this fascinating study here: http://www.foodconsumer.org/newsite/Nutrition/Phytochemicals/asparagus_breast_cancer_1228120409.html

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