Baby Book Donation Program
Welcome,  Visitor

Search:

Quick Facts

Food Products A-Z
Food Ingredients A-Z
Member Benefits
Create an Avoid List
The Facts
Our Health Score
Ingredients Not Disclosed
Reading Nutrition Labels
Nutritional Factors
Allergen Icon Guide
Allergies 101
Wheat
What is a Wheat Allergy
Causes and Symptoms
How To Test And Diagnose
How To Manage
Ingredients To Avoid
Substitutes
Suggestions for Wheat-Free Cooking
Resources
What is a Food Allergy?
Other Conditions That Are Mistaken For Food Allergies
Causes
Symptoms
How To Test And Diagnose
How To Manage
Resources
Dairy
What is a Dairy Allergy?
Causes and Symptoms
How To Test And Diagnose
How To Manage
Ingredients To Avoid
Substitutes
Suggestions for Cow's Milk / Dairy-free Eating
Resources
Eggs
What is an Egg Allergy
Causes and Symptoms
How to test and diagnose
How to manage
Ingredients to avoid
Substitutes
Suggestions for Egg-free eating
Resources
Fish
What is a Fish Allergy?
Causes and Symptoms
How to Test and Diagnose
How to Manage
Ingredients to Avoid
Substitutes
Resources
Gluten
What is Gluten Intolerance
Causes and Symptoms
How to Test and Diagnose
How to Manage
Ingredients to Avoid
Substitutes
Suggestions for Gluten-Free Cooking
Resources
Peanuts
What is a Peanut Allergy
Causes and Symptoms
How To Test And Diagnose
How To Manage
Ingredients To Avoid
Substitutions
Resources
Shellfish
What is a Shellfish Allergy?
How To Test And Diagnose
How To Manage
Ingredients To Avoid
Substitutes
Resources
Soy
What is a Soy Allergy
Causes and Symptoms
How To Test And Diagnose
How To Manage
Ingredients To Avoid
Substitutions
Resources
Tree Nuts
How To Manage
Ingredients To Avoid
Substitutes
Resources
What is a Tree Nut Allergy
Causes and Symptoms
How To Test And Diagnose
Controversial Ingredients
Trans Fat
Food Additives
Natural Flavoring
Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)
Food Coloring
Resources
FAQ
Foodfacts Lists
Manufacturer Resources
Manufacture FAQs
Using Our Score
FoodFacts FAQ
Our Health Score
Site Map
Food Recalls
Suggest a Product
Tri Nutritionals
The Rak Foundation

New York City may be leading the way … new studies show stronger links between sugar-sweetened beverages and obesity

FoodFacts.com has learned that this has been a busy week for the sugar-sweetened beverage and obesity debate. Coming right off the heels of the New York City ban on the sale of large-sized sugary beverages at certain establishments, there were three new studies published this week that are suggesting that New York City has the right idea and may, in fact, be leading the way towards stronger regulations from the federal government.

We know that a third of American adults and about 17% of American kids are currently obese. It has been suggested that sugary beverages have contributed to the obesity problem as the rate of consumption of those drinks has risen at the same pace as the obesity problem since the late 70s. But these new studies which were published this past week in the New England Journal of Medicine directly explored the effects of sugar-sweetened drinks on weight.

The first two studies were random trials. One involved over 600 children split into groups. One group was given a sugar-sweetened beverage to drink and the other a sugar-free version of the same drink. They were followed for a year and a half. While both groups of children gained weight over the period, the group consuming the sugar-sweetened beverage gained over two pounds more over the same period of time.

The other involved tracking over 200 overweight or obese adolescents whose diets regularly included sugary beverages. One group was given only diet beverages and water over a full year period. This group had the beverages delivered directly to their homes for tracking purposes. The other group continued to drink the sugary beverages they had always consumed without any change to their habits.

By the end of the study period, the group drinking the sugar-sweetened beverages had appreciably higher BMIs than the group given the diet beverages and water.

The final study focused on over 30,000 men and women of European ancestry over a course of time. Among those involved in the study who were genetically predisposed to obesity, higher consumption levels of sugar-sweetened drinks were linked to higher BMI.

The American Beverage Association released a statement regarding the studies, “Obesity is a serious and complex public health issue facing our nation and the rest of the world, and we all must work together to solve it. We know, and science supports, that obesity is not uniquely caused by any single food or beverage. Thus, studies and opinion pieces that focus solely on sugar-sweetened beverages, or any other single source of calories, do nothing meaningful to help address this serious issue.”

Health and medical groups are now appealing to the U.S. Surgeon General to publish a report on sugary beverages and obesity. The report they are seeking is based on the idea that sugar-sweetened beverages need the same treatment from the federal government as cigarette smoking and its relationship to cancer.

Perhaps, despite the tremendous concern among New Yorkers regarding the ban on large-sized sugary beverages, the city’s mayor is actually on the cutting edge of the fight against obesity. FoodFacts.com is looking forward to following this issue and bringing our community breaking information regarding other bans that may ensue from the results of these new studies – and possibly even some action from the Surgeon General’s office as well.

We invite you to read more: http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2012/09/sugary-drinks-get-the-one-two-three-punch-from-obesity-research/#.UGIrEtWdHIV
http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2012/07/health-groups-call-on-surgeon-general-for-report-on-soda/#.UGIrJ9WdHIW

Comments

This entry was posted in beverages, obesity, Soda, sugar, Sugar-Sweetened Beverages, Sugar-Sweetened Drinks, Sugary Beverages, Sugary Drinks and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.