Baby Book Donation Program
Welcome,  Visitor

Search:

Quick Facts

Food Products A-Z
Food Ingredients A-Z
Member Benefits
Create an Avoid List
The Facts
Our Health Score
Ingredients Not Disclosed
Reading Nutrition Labels
Nutritional Factors
Allergen Icon Guide
Allergies 101
Wheat
What is a Wheat Allergy
Causes and Symptoms
How To Test And Diagnose
How To Manage
Ingredients To Avoid
Substitutes
Suggestions for Wheat-Free Cooking
Resources
What is a Food Allergy?
Other Conditions That Are Mistaken For Food Allergies
Causes
Symptoms
How To Test And Diagnose
How To Manage
Resources
Dairy
What is a Dairy Allergy?
Causes and Symptoms
How To Test And Diagnose
How To Manage
Ingredients To Avoid
Substitutes
Suggestions for Cow's Milk / Dairy-free Eating
Resources
Eggs
What is an Egg Allergy
Causes and Symptoms
How to test and diagnose
How to manage
Ingredients to avoid
Substitutes
Suggestions for Egg-free eating
Resources
Fish
What is a Fish Allergy?
Causes and Symptoms
How to Test and Diagnose
How to Manage
Ingredients to Avoid
Substitutes
Resources
Gluten
What is Gluten Intolerance
Causes and Symptoms
How to Test and Diagnose
How to Manage
Ingredients to Avoid
Substitutes
Suggestions for Gluten-Free Cooking
Resources
Peanuts
What is a Peanut Allergy
Causes and Symptoms
How To Test And Diagnose
How To Manage
Ingredients To Avoid
Substitutions
Resources
Shellfish
What is a Shellfish Allergy?
How To Test And Diagnose
How To Manage
Ingredients To Avoid
Substitutes
Resources
Soy
What is a Soy Allergy
Causes and Symptoms
How To Test And Diagnose
How To Manage
Ingredients To Avoid
Substitutions
Resources
Tree Nuts
How To Manage
Ingredients To Avoid
Substitutes
Resources
What is a Tree Nut Allergy
Causes and Symptoms
How To Test And Diagnose
Controversial Ingredients
Trans Fat
Food Additives
Natural Flavoring
Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)
Food Coloring
Resources
FAQ
Foodfacts Lists
Manufacturer Resources
Manufacture FAQs
Using Our Score
FoodFacts FAQ
Our Health Score
Site Map
Food Recalls
Suggest a Product
Tri Nutritionals
The Rak Foundation

The latest news on caffeine and skin cancer

Food Facts came across some great information regarding caffeine intake and skin cancer that we wanted to make sure we brought to the attention of our community.

A new study published here in the United States has linked the increase of caffeine a person’s diet with a lower risk of basil cell carcinoma.  Basil cell carcinoma is the most common type of skin cancer.  The study included over 110,000 people and was published in early July in the journal Cancer Research.

Dr. Jiali Han, an associate professor with Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School in Boston and the Harvard School of Public Health went on record saying:   “I would not recommend increasing your coffee intake based on these data alone.”  However, he did add that basal cell carcinoma is just one of a growing list of diseases that appear to be positively affected by increasing coffee/caffeine intake.  That list includes diseases like Type 2 Diabetes and Parkinson’s disease.

Most skin cancers  treated in the U.S. are basal cell skin cancers.  This is the type that begins in the epidermis (the skin’s top layer) and results from regular exposure to ultraviolet radiation.  Basal Cell Carcinoma is a slow-growing cancer which is not life-threatening.   However, it still requires costly treatment.  Any finding that helps prevent the disease can have a positive effect on the public health and our over-burdened health care system.

There were 112,897 people taking part in the health study.  Of those participants a little over 22,700 developed basal cell carcinoma during the 20 years of follow up involved in the study.

It was found that the more caffeine participants consumed, the lower their risk of developing Basal Cell Carcinoma.   They then ranked the study participants according to their caffeine consumption and found that in the case of women, the top 20% of consumers had an 18% lower risk of developing the cancer than the bottom 20%.  The risk was lower for men by 13%

For coffee specifically, it was found that women drinking 3 cups of coffee per day had a 21% lower risk of developing the skin cancer and risk for men was 10% lower.  Caffeine from other food and beverage sources were found to have a similar effect.   The consumption of decaffeinated coffee, however did not correspond to a similar decrease in risk.

It was noted that more study is needed that will include different populations.  It is also important to note that the increase of caffeine consumption showed no effect on developing other forms of skin cancer.

Food Facts thinks that the ability to help prevent Basal Cell Carcinoma through an increase in caffeine is just one of the first steps of many to discovering how food and ingredients both positively and negatively can affect our health.  Stay informed.  It makes a world of difference.

Read more at:  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/247423.php

 

Comments

This entry was posted in caffeine, coffee, skin cancer and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.