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Granola: Not Good?

Granola | Foodfacts.com

Granola | Foodfacts.com

Foodfacts.com encountered a very interesting article in Healthier Talk pointing out an interesting fact: Granola is carbohydrate cooked in fat.

According to Dr. Henry G. Bieler, physician to Anthony Quinn, Greta Garbo, Lucille Ball, and many other Hollywood celebrities, and author of the bestselling health food book Food Is Your Best Medicine, when carbohydrates are cooked in fat or oil, chemical reactions take place that produce indigestible molecules that the human digestive, endocrine, and eliminatory systems simply can’t handle. Consequently, these indigestible molecules build up in the body and cause various sorts of systemic toxemia.

The purest example of this principle is Olestra, a commercial fat substitute produced by heating together sugar (a carbohydrate) and vegetable oil (a fat) until a molecule is formed that is too large and ungainly-shaped to be absorbed by the human digestive system. Originally touted as a wonder additive to such high-fat foods as potato chips that would yield the same culinary sensation as oil but would add no calories to the diet, Olestra was soon found to have a number of undesirable side effects, including abdominal cramping and diarrhea. Furthermore, it readily absorbed fat-soluble vitamins from foods and simply flushed them out of the body before they could be assimilated. Another unwelcome side effect was steatorrhea, the accumulation of through-passing Olestra in the stool.

Dr. Bieler’s long list of offending foods containing carbohydrates cooked in fat, compiled before Granola and Olestra hit the market, includes donuts, French fries, potato chips, cookies, cake, and even bread that contains shortening. None of these has molecules are as wholly indigestible as Olestra, and that in and of itself is a potential issue, since the molecules in such foods are partially digestible, passing through the intestinal lining but not being fully assimilated thereafter. It is, in Bieler’s opinion, these partially digestible, “weird” molecules that lodge themselves irremovably in our systems and thus accumulate over time that give rise to increasing systemic toxemia and consequent ill health, ranging from susceptibility to colds to cancer and cardiovascular disease.

Granola, with its high carbohydrate and oil content, would have been high on Bieler’s list had it been on the market at the time he published it.

But isn’t Granola made with “good,” unrefined, monounsaturated oils, like olive and canola? Usually, yes, it is, but the fact is, that doesn’t matter! What does matter is that those “good” oils have been heated with carbohydrate until the qualities that make them good have been neutralized by the chemical reactions that take place during the cooking process.

What to do? One solution, aside from avoiding Granola and most other products containing carbohydrates cooked in fat (or oil), is to enjoy those “good” oils in culinary concoctions that don’t involve cooking them with carbohydrate. Among the favorites of many is air-popped popcorn sprayed with olive oil from a garden spray bottle and seasoned to taste with sea salt. Warning: This concoction is fattening, so enjoy it in moderation.

What else do you really now about the foods you like to eat? SCORE THEM with the unique Food Facts Health Score. Check it out! Membership is FREE at Foodfacts.com.

Image:        The Daily Eater

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