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The Secret of How To Interpret a Food Label

Food Laberl | Foodfacts.com

Food Label | Foodfacts.com

“You need to eat less calories, exercise more and choose healthier foods.” Does this sound familiar? Often times after leaving a doctor’s appointment and being informed about your ever rising cholesterol levels, borderline blood pressure and excessive weight gain, you leave the office with these words of wisdom. It sounds like a great idea but as you start to think about your plan of action, you often wonder what these code words mean. It seems as though you need to figure out how to decipher the code to become successful in obtaining your doctor’s wishes in improving your health, but at the same time you struggle in trying not to lose your sense of satisfaction of fulfillment when nourishing your body. Just how much do you give up to obtain a healthy lifestyle without compromising the joy you experience from eating your favorite foods?

Foodfacts.com is a dedicated and objective resource that allows consumers to independently analyze and decide what foods ingredients are contained within the foods they eat. It becomes much easier to avoid those foods that should not be consumed.

But, in researching thuds article for the Foodfacts.com Blog, we noticed that dietitians continue to experience a transition of sorts in terms of their thinking and approach with food labeling. It might be difficult, as it will take some work and effort on your part, especially in the beginning as you learn how to retrain your body into craving specific food items. Understanding food labels and knowing what to look for while grocery shopping is the starting point to your success in becoming a healthier you.

Depending on your personal goals, there are specific items you should target for your individual needs. As a post bariatric patient, protein is a very important food component. It is not only is used for growth and repair of the human body, but since carbohydrates are limited due to potential dumping syndrome (such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea), protein is also used as a source of energy. Therefore, when reading a food label, the first item you should review is the amount of protein in that product. The values will differ from various food sources, i.e. animal protein will contain a larger amount of protein than a piece of fruit or a vegetable would. This means the higher the protein, the more beneficial.

Of course, be sure to also regularly check resources like Foodfacts.com for the latest and most independently verified food label information.

Obesityhelp.com

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